Archive

May 27th, 2016

Destroying Israel From Within

    Israel has recently been under intense criticism on the world stage. Some of it, like the “boycott, divestment, sanctions” (BDS) campaign, is a campus movement to destroy Israel masquerading as a political critique. But a lot of it is also driven by Israel’s desire to destroy itself — thanks to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s steady elimination of any possibility that Israel will separate itself from the Palestinians in the West Bank.

    Netanyahu is a man who is forever dog paddling in the middle of the Rubicon, never crossing it, always teasing you (“I’m coming your way — I’m going to make a decision”), only to remain right where he is, balancing between all his rivals, so that he alone survives. Meanwhile, Israel sinks ever deeper into a de facto binational state controlled by Jewish extremists.

    Soon, this newspaper will have to call Netanyahu what he’s made himself into: “Prime Minister of the State of Israel-Palestine.”

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Presidential race gets harder to predict

    With a bunch of new polls released over the weekend, speculation about how a general election race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump ends is beginning to matter. Just not in the way you would think, based on all the hype.

    We have three ways to predict what will happen, each with strengths and weaknesses. First, there are prediction methods based on the "fundamentals" of the election. Then we have betting markets and polls.

    - Fundamentals

    Political scientists and others have developed models to predict elections based only on what we can know before the candidates are chosen and their campaigns take place. It turns out that roughly four factors matter. The incumbent party's candidate does better when the economy is strong, when presidential approval is high and when the nation is at peace. But the candidate's chances appear to suffer if the incumbent party has already had two or more terms in the White House.

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Maybe those TSA lines would shrink if airlines stopped charging for checked bags

    The airlines could do something today that might ease your wait in airport security checkpoint lines tomorrow: Stop charging fees for checked baggage.

    Up until now, the wrath of air travelers has been focused on the Transportation Security Administration, and not without reason. Government watchdogs have documented several critical lapses at the TSA in recent years, such as undercover operatives managing to make it through checkpoints with illegal weapons and phony bombs and inadequate vetting of aviation employees before issuing them security credentials. Members of Congress have accused the agency of not adequately planning for the crush of travelers this spring, despite ample warning that record numbers of people would be flying.

    But TSA also has a tough job. In recent years, Congress also has cut its budget while the number of air travelers has increased. TSA Administrator Peter Neffenger, who took over less than a year ago, has made tightening security a priority. And they're trying to ease the crunch: earlier this month, the TSA announced a 10-point plan to reduce wait times by increasing staff and redeploying officers.

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Law's spirit counts when someone isn't quite fired

    It's complicated to sue for discriminatory firing when you haven't actually been fired. But it's doable. The lesson from the Supreme Court on Monday is that timing matters.

    The justices weighed in on the important question of when the clock starts for plaintiffs who have been "constructively discharged" -- that is, effectively fired because of discriminatory treatment. Seven of the eight justices agreed that if someone quit a job and alleges discrimination was the reason, his claim starts when he quit, not when the discriminatory treatment against him is said to have occurred.

    The decision is a wise one, reflecting a common-sense understanding of this sort of discrimination. It's important because it shows the court is willing to enforce anti-discrimination laws, notwithstanding the literal words of the law. Only Justice Clarence Thomas, the last of the Scalia-style literalists, dissented.

    The facts of the case, Green v. Brennan, were classics of the constructive-discharge genre. Marvin Green, a 35-year veteran of the Post Office, applied to be postmaster of Englewood, Colorado. When he didn't get the job, he sued for racial discrimination.

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Let's not squander the talents of our immigrants

    It is often said that the problem with immigrants is that they're poor and contribute only their cheap labor when they get here.

    But rarely discussed is the fact that the United States does a terrible job of enabling the immigrants who already have post-secondary certifications, college degrees and professional work experience to continue their careers once they've arrived.

    To start, a foreign-trained professional has to make his or her way to this country legally, navigating the red tape of visas and permissions, and, of course, master the English language. Then they must maneuver the thicket of proving their credentials and work experience.

    If you've had to pull copies of your college transcripts in the last few years, you know it couldn't be easier. It's generally a short order on a website and a credit card payment, and you get PDFs within 48 hours.

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May 25th

Stop freaking out, Democrats. The party will unify. Probably.

    Will Bernie Sanders burn it all down on the way out? While it is still always possible that things could get very contentious and destructive among Democrats, all the way to the convention and beyond, new data points out Friday suggest that he might not.

    A new New York Times/CBS poll finds:

    "Twenty-eight percent of Mr. Sanders's primary voters say they will not support her if she is the nominee, a figure that reflects the continuing anger many Sanders supporters feel toward both Mrs. Clinton and a process they believe is unfair."

    That sounds worrisome. But it turns out that things may have been worse in 2008, as the primary battle between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama wound down.

    A NYT/CBS poll from April of 2008 found:

    "Looking ahead to November, 35 percent of Clinton's voters now say they would vote for McCain in the fall if Obama is the Democratic nominee."

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Sanctity Of Life It Is Not

    Hardly a proposal regarding "women's health" doesn't include some aspect of abortion accompanied by great beating of chests claiming it is done only in the interest of sanctity of life. Yet these same people are proponents of no gun controls and the death penalty. Did I miss something? It certainly doesn't add up.

    Either it is life in all aspects or there is some other underlying condition. I strongly suspect it is the latter. My first choice is pure power. The nearest word to sanctity is sanctimony. The spelling is similar placing them in proximity in a dictionary, but the meaning is vastly different. The former is pure while the latter is hypocrisy. That leaves little doubt as to the standing of those who would loudly proclaim sanctity of life when dealing with women but little crossover in other life and death matters.

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‘Box’ tells ex-convicts: ‘Don’t apply; if you do, lie'

    Before discussing a sensitive subject, let us recite the Rotary Four-Way Test:

    “Is it the truth? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build goodwill and friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned?”

    I’m not a Rotarian. I just like the Rotary Test for conduct.

    If our actions met that test, this would generate no argument: As President Obama has done with federal hiring, every state should “ban the box” that effectively blocks an ex-convict from being considered by employers.

    For those who think this is just one of those bleeding heart liberal fixations – Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders being strong supporters – Gov. Chris Christie signed a similar order for New Jersey, and Republican Sen. Rand Paul is one of several conservatives who’ve joined Democrats in supporting legislation that would seal the records of prior offenders.

    If we can’t ban the box, employers should step up to the plate and resolve the problem that it represents.

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A world without facts

    You are about to read a newspaper article. Do you care whether all the facts in it are true? If so - what could convince you that they are or are not? A friend? A neutral website? Someone in authority?

    If you aren't really sure, then welcome to the world of fact-checking. In the past several years, as it has become easier to spread misinformation and conspiracy theories on the Internet, politically neutral fact-checking websites have sprung up in response. The Post itself created an early version, the "Fact Checker" column, led by Glenn Kessler, which awards up to four "Pinocchios" for dubious statements made by politicians from both political parties, depending on their level of outrageousness. Others include PolitiFact.com, FullFact.org in Britain, Chequeado in Argentina and StopFake.org in Ukraine.

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If a suit against you is dismissed, that's a win

    The Supreme Court's decision on attorneys' fees is not really about attorneys' fees. Behind the bland topic lies a deep and interesting philosophical question about the nature of a lawsuit, especially one brought on civil rights grounds: What counts as a win?

    The Supreme Court answered this question Thursday in a case called CRST Van Expedited v. EEOC. The case involved a $4 million award of fees that the trial court ordered the government to pay the trucking company's lawyers after the court dismissed more than 150 sex harassment claims brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission against the company.

    Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a court can order the government to pay a defendant's attorneys' fees if the defendant prevails in court and the claims were "frivolous, unreasonable, or groundless." The issue before the Supreme Court was whether the trucking company counted as the prevailing party in the dismissed lawsuits.

    You might think the question of who is a "prevailing party" sounds easy: Did you win in court or didn't you?

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