Archive

September 11th, 2016

Trump's ignorance shows disdain for military

    It would have been nice to have been able to compare the candidates for president of the United States, and their plans for the military, veterans and national affairs.

    It would have helped to describe how Matt Lauer and NBC could have done a better job in orchestrating their so-called Commander in Chief forum on Wednesday night. It might have been useful to discuss how Hillary Clinton could have avoided giving up a third of her half-hour to questions about her emails. (Answer: It might have helped if she had held regular press conferences over the last year to deal with that issue.)

    But none of these subjects seems even as remotely relevant as the plain fact that the Republican nominee demonstrated yet again how he is entirely unprepared to be president.

    Donald Trump's answers on Wednesday night rarely reached the level of "wrong." Mostly what he said was incoherent gibberish.

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We'll never forget 9/11. How should we remember Ground Zero?

    In the frequently contentious debate over Ground Zero, the Vesey Street stairs generated an especially heated conflict.

    For hundreds of workers who managed to escape the World Trade Center complex on Sept. 11, 2001, the two flights of stairs were a cherished symbol. The stairs had led them from the site's elevated plaza, away from the collapsing buildings and falling debris, to the relative safety of the streets beyond. In the words of one survivor, "They were the path to freedom."

    For preservationists, the stairs were also important artifacts: the last above-ground remnants of the World Trade Center. "[They] will be the most dramatic original piece of the site that will have meaning to generations to come," Richard Moe, then president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, said in 2006, when the group petitioned for the stairs to be kept in place.

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The files of credit reporting agencies are full of errors

    Apartment hunting in Philadelphia is already hectic enough. So relief washed over me when my girlfriend and I found a charming spot that worked for us. But before I was able to sign the lease, I received a call from the landlord, and he spoke slowly. He seemed concerned, and for good reason: After running a tenant screening on me using a service provided by the credit-reporting behemoth TransUnion, a clutch of criminal offenses appeared, including two felony firearms convictions. He said it didn't seem to square with what he had expected from a public-radio reporter moving from one trendy neighborhood to another.

    It didn't. I have never owned nor fired a weapon in my life. The other charges the agency listed were equally as baffling, since they were just as made up. A case of mistaken identity, I thought, should be easy to clear up.

    I was wrong. It took me more than a dozen phone calls, the handiwork of a county court clerk and six weeks to solve the problem. And that was only after I contacted the company's communications department as a journalist.

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The damage Trump has wrought in Virginia

    It's been clear that the Virginia GOP establishment despises Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. But an editorial in the Richmond Times-Dispatch Sunday morning underlined just how despised he really is.

    With a buttoned-down air of privilege and calm, the conservative newspaper has steadfastly endorsed Republican candidates since at least 1980 and Ronald Reagan. This time around, it is backing Gary Johnson, a former governor of New Mexico who is by turns described as "hard-right" and "fiscally conservative and socially liberal."

    The editorial argued that neither Trump nor Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is suited to be head of state. The editors wrote that Trump "has demonstrated again and again that he thinks few people aside from his own magnificent self have any worth whatsoever." Clinton "not only lies with abandon; once caught, she then lies about having lied."

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Sorry folks, veterans are not necessarily experts on foreign policy

    There was something a little icky about last night's "Commander in Chief Forum," though it took me a while to put my finger on it.

    Was it Donald Trump's hair, or his fawning over Vladimir Putin? No, these particular forms of ickiness are nothing new. For the same reason, it can't have been Hillary Clinton's insistence on using the passive voice when describing her decision to use a private email server ("It was something that should not have been done.") That's also old ickiness.

    In the end, it was the event itself.

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Snowden is turning into a liability for Putin

    Edward Snowden is increasingly unhappy with the situation in Russia, where he has lived for more than three years. President Vladimir Putin once welcomed the National Security Agency contractor for his propaganda value, but he may be wondering if it's all been worth it.

    Snowden arrived in Moscow in June 2013. That was almost a year before the Crimea annexation, and Russia could still try to sell itself to radical leftists who admired Snowden as the lesser evil, compared with the Big Brother U.S. Putin talked a lot about Snowden showing obvious delight for thumbing his nose at the U.S., which had tried to intercept the whistle-blower. He described Snowden as a "weird guy," an idealist, who was safe in Russia even though he had no secrets to pass on.

    After Crimea, though, such statements started to appear hollow. "Russia is not the kind of country that hands over fighters for human rights," Putin said at the St. Petersburg Economic Forum in May 2014. That the Russian president could talk about human rights after faking a secession referendum in Crimea would have been funny if it weren't so manipulative.

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Mother Teresa ain't so saintly

    Heresy comes in different shapes and sizes. In many ways, like pornography, it depends on the eye of the beholder. But if not buying the idea that Mother Teresa is now Saint Teresa counts as heresy, call me a heretic.

    Unlike most of her critics, I'm willing to admit that Mother Teresa was a wonderful person who lived a saintly life devoted to helping the poor, in India and around the world. It's just too bad Pope Francis had to mess it up by declaring her a saint.

    Let's face it, the whole concept of sainthood is so medieval, dating back to the days when uneducated masses actually believed in angels, dragons, leprechauns, and miracles. The vast majority of today's educated faithful only laugh at the idea that there's a little band of saints floating around somewhere, just waiting, when called on, to intervene in human affairs in ways that defy reason or science.

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How Russia could spark a U.S. electoral disaster

    "U.S. investigates potential covert Russian plan to disrupt November elections." To those unused to this kind of story, I can imagine that headline, from The Washington Post this week, seemed strange. A secret Russian plot to throw a U.S. election through a massive hack of the electoral system? It sounds like a thriller, or a movie starring Harrison Ford.

    In fact, the scenario under investigation has already taken place, in whole or in part, in other countries. Quite a bit of the story is already unfolding in public; strictly speaking, it's not "secret" or "covert" at all. But because most Americans haven't seen this kind of game played before (most Americans, quite wisely, don't follow political news from Central Europe or Ukraine), I think the scenario needs to be fully spelled out. And so, based on Russia's past tactics in other countries, assuming it acts more or less the same way it acts elsewhere, here's what could happen over the next two months:

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Driving is at a crossroads (sorry!)

    Remember "Peak Car"? Vehicle miles traveled per capita hit an all-time high of just over 10,000 a year in 2004 - then declined for nine straight years, spawning a belief that the car-happy United States might have finally maxed out on driving. Baby boomers were retiring, millennials liked walkable cities, and more workers telecommuted. Futurists touted lower emissions of carbon dioxide and less valuable time wasted in traffic.

    Well, as anyone who rode the interstates this summer can attest, cars are back. Vehicle miles traveled per capita rose in 2014, 2015 and in the first half of 2016, according to the Federal Highway Administration.

    Cheap gas is one reason: A gallon of regular cost an average of$2.24 during the week ending Aug. 29 - about the same, in inflation-adjusted terms, as in 2004. A bigger factor, though, is the slow, steady economic recovery. As Eric Sundquist and Chris McCahill of the University of Wisconsin's State Smart Transportation Initiative have shown, driving correlates even more strongly with gross domestic product growth than with gas prices.

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Computing the social value of Uber. (It's high.)

    How much would be lost if Uber simply went away? That's actually happened in Austin, Texas, and the service has faced legal troubles in France, Spain, Germany and parts of India.

    How much is really at stake? A new paper by Peter Cohen, Robert Hahn, Jonathan Hall, Steven Levitt (of "Freakonomics" fame) and Robert Metcalfe comes up with a pretty good, dollars-and-cents measure of how much UberX, the main Uber service, is improving the lives of its users.

    Based on their study, here are a few ways of framing the value of Uber ride services to Americans:

    - For a typical dollar spent by consumers on UberX, they receive $1.60 worth of gain.

    That's an unusually high amount of "consumer surplus," as it is called by economists. It means there aren't that many close substitutes for Uber at prevailing prices, as moving people around is something the U.S. does not do especially well.

    - UberX produces daily social value of about $18 million.

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