Archive

March 10th, 2016

Mourning more than the loss of Nancy Reagan

    While I was growing up in the 1980s, Nancy Reagan, who passed away March 6 at the age of 94, wasn't my favorite. Then the first lady of the United States, wife of President Ronald Reagan, seemed to my teenage self a cold, stern figure who lectured us to "Just Say No" to drugs. The Hollywood glamour she and her husband brought to the White House those eight years only added to the distance -- psychological and experiential -- that seemed to be between her and me. That view of Reagan continued long after she left Washington.

    But all that changed in the evening hours of June 11, 2004.

    We all watched the nation pay its respects to the 40th president of the United States. The man who led the Reagan Revolution and who so many Republican leaders struggle to emulate was being laid to rest after succumbing to Alzheimer's disease. The pageantry started in Washington and ended in the glowing sunset at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California.

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Law schools should have to be really honest

    You'll be forgiven for chuckling at the story that a former law student is suing her law school because she didn't get a job she liked after graduation. What could be more measure for measure? The Thomas Jefferson School of Law in San Diego taught Anna Alaburda to sue. Now she's suing it.

    Alaburda's suit essentially alleges false advertising: She says the school misrepresented the employment record of its graduates, inducing her to attend and amass debt.

    She probably won't win any money, especially because it turns out she actually was offered a $60,000-a-year law firm job after graduation, which she turned down because other non-law jobs paid better.

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Apple VP: The FBI wants to roll back safeguards that keep us a step ahead of criminals

   As the head of software engineering at Apple, I think nothing is more important than the safety of all of our customers. Even as we strive to deliver delightful experiences to users of iPhones, iPads and Macs, our team must work tirelessly to stay one step ahead of criminal attackers who seek to pry into personal information and even co-opt devices to commit broader assaults that endanger us all. Sadly, these threats only grow more serious and sophisticated over time.

    In just the past 18 months, hackers have repeatedly breached the defenses of retail chains, banks and even the federal government, making off with the credit card information, Social Security numbers and fingerprint records of millions of people.

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When Fallacies Collide

    The formal debates among the Republicans who would be president have exceeded all expectations. Even the most hardened cynics couldn’t have imagined that the candidates would sink so low, and stay so focused on personal insults. Yet last week, offstage, there was in effect a real debate about economic policy between Donald Trump and Mitt Romney, who is trying to block his nomination.

    Unfortunately, both men are talking nonsense. Are you surprised?

    The starting point for this debate is Trump’s deviation from free-market orthodoxy on international trade. Attacks on immigrants are still the central theme of the Republican front-runner’s campaign, but he has opened a second front on trade deficits, which he asserts are being caused by the currency manipulation of other countries, especially China. This manipulation, he says, is “robbing Americans of billions of dollars of capital and millions of jobs.”

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The Republicans' race to the bottom

    On the day Mitt Romney called Donald Trump a con man, a fraud and a phony, and Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz subsequently ran Trump through a televised debate buzz saw, the Republican Party may have hit a new low in self-disparagement.

    Its 2012 presidential nominee first provided the Fox News debate team all the raw material required to keep Trump on the defensive for two hours. Then the debaters did the rest, as Rubio joined Trump in a display of gutter-speak over such matters as genitalia size and other matters better suited for locker-room chatter.

    For once, attempts were made to draw out Trump on his unending boasts about his wealth and charity, raising doubts about both and generating flashes of anger and impatience from Trump. But once again, it was all about Donald as near-panic seized the party over the prospect of his nomination in July.

    At one point, moderator Chris Wallace quoted verbatim from Romney's all-purpose indictment of Trump: "The bullying, the greed, the showing off, the misogyny, the absurd third-grade theatrics."

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Presidential politics' worst day ever

    Children, gather round and let me tell you about a time before candidates vouched for the size of their, um, endowments on national television.

    Was it really so long ago -- OK, actually, it was -- that a sunglasses-wearing Bill Clinton was criticized for going on "The Arsenio Hall Show" to play his saxophone? Clinton coarsened the discourse, we were told. How tame that seems in retrospect. How dignified.

    I blame Clinton, actually, not for the Hall performance, but for a fateful moment during his presidency, at a 1994 MTV town hall, when a young woman asked, "Mr. President, the world is dying to know: Is it boxers or briefs?"

    Clinton stared in open-mouthed disbelief, looked down, put hand to forehead -- then answered, "Usually briefs. I can't believe she did that." I happened to be at the event, and I couldn't believe he responded with anything other than an admonition that surely this questioner had been taught better.

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President Tr(i)ump(h) the Insult Comic Dog?

    "You can't insult your way to the White House," Jeb Bush told Donald Trump in an early Republican presidential debate. Oh, really?

    Trump has since seized a commanding lead as the party's frontrunner. Jeb Bush, who entered the race with the biggest war chest outside of Trump's pocket change, has dropped out.

    Two of his remaining competitors, Sens. Marco Rubio of Florida and Ted Cruz of Texas, belatedly are trying to bully the Donald. That's a tough battle. History may well remember Trump's campaign as an ongoing imitation of his near-namesake, the foul-mouthed, cigar-chomping puppet Triumph the Insult Comic Dog.

    It works because, despite his lack of experience in public office -- or, for that matter, public service -- Trump has studied the political scene closely over the past two decades as he contemplated and repeatedly backed away from the presidential run he finally is making now.

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Marco Rubio and the myth of the establishment lane

    The Holy Grail has one up on the Establishment Lane. At least someone was able to find the Holy Grail.

    Marco Rubio has not been so lucky.

    Did you know that if you whisper "George Herbert Walker Bush" three times into a mirror, the Establishment Lane will appear and open a path to victory for you?

    The media has said it often and it must be true.

    The Establishment Lane was a beautiful legend. Imagine! A lane where all you needed was major donors and the support of party leaders, and voters would flow like milk and honey.

    It is just north of the Fountain of Youth, right past the Big Rock Candy Mountain, but before you find the Holy Grail. It is visible in the background of photos of Bigfoot, although you cannot see it because the photos are always so blurry.

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'House of Cards' has become an escapist utopia

    "House of Cards" is back. And just in time to offer an escape from the hilarious dystopia of our actual politics into the utopian vision of a politics where, if things go wrong, it is because an evil someone behind the scenes knows what he or she is doing.

    If only.

    The one true rule of politics is Hanlon's Razor, which states that you should never attribute to malice what can be attributed to stupidity.

    This pretty much rules out "House of Cards."

    Its dysfunctional politics are dysfunctional because people are interested in making deals. Making deals! Can you imagine?

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Hillary Clinton's pledge to remove all lead from the U.S. in five years is just not possible

    The crisis in Flint, Mich. -- site of Sunday night's Democratic debate -- was a crisis centered on the tragic combination of corrosive river water and outdated lead pipes in the city. When Hillary Clinton called for the debate in Flint -- to which Bernie Sanders quickly agreed -- the point was clearly to both criticize the Republican governor of the state and to present ways in which Flint's lead problem could be addressed.

    On Sunday night, lead was introduced as a topic immediately. A member of the audience rose to ask the Democrats if they would support a national effort in their first 100 days in office to remove all lead service lines in the country. Sanders said he'd quickly seek to test the nation's water systems and inform homeowners about the quality in their homes.

    Clinton went further, as she herself said.

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